Singing When the Road is Hard


We know about Jesus’ miracles. His teaching. His preaching.

But don’t forget His singing.

Yes, Jesus sang.

I saw "Rock and Roll Jesus" this summer at Santa Monica Beach in southern California. When I say Jesus sang, this is NOT what I mean.

I saw “Rock and Roll Jesus” this summer at Santa Monica Beach in southern California. When I say Jesus sang, this is NOT what I mean.

The Jewish people have a long history of singing, and the Bible even includes their songbook. I assume Jesus sang on many occasions, but it is only mentioned once in the gospels. It was right after His last meal with the disciples, just hours before the cross.

“When they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives” (Matt. 26:30).

I can’t help but wonder if that song was a song of praise that helped Him keep perspective on what was about to happen. The cross was before Him, but He sang and kept His focus on the Father.

When the road is hard, sing.

That sounds like the chorus of a country song, but Jesus did it first. No one faced a more difficult path, but He took time to sing with his disciples before he headed to the garden—and the cross.

I don’t know what the road is like you’re on, but sing. Sing to Jesus. When praise to Him is coming out of your mouth, your focus is on the One who walks with you.

A great revival hit American beginning in 1790. We call it the Second Great Awakening, and during this movement of God, many African-Americans found salvation. They were now free in Christ, but they still lived in physical bondage.

The road was hard, but they sang. The spirituals they sang used biblical themes and reminded them of a great day coming, a day when their freedom in Christ would be fully and completely realized.

When the road is hard, sing.

Since Jesus sang on a hard road, maybe I should too.

“Sing and make music from your heart to the Lord, always giving thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Eph. 5:19-20).

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